Friday, August 11, 2017

InstaNews: Living in a world of instant news

When I studied journalism in college, we learned about the origins of newspapers, radio news and TV news, which were developed respectively. Now we live in a world of knowing about news instantly because of cellphones. When I was recently on vacation, I heard via text alerts about some of the news happening nationally and locally in the five-county region of Philadelphia.

After I heard that Downingtown Area School District Superintendent Lawrence Mussoline designated a time for district employees to “turn off to tune in to your family” during Thanksgiving, I reported about it because it was unique feel-good story. At his request, all 1,500 district employees were disconnected from the district email server during their week break. Mussoline noted that time was designated to be spent focusing on family, rather than being connected to their email on their smart phones while in a social setting, for example.

“The good is that we live in an instantaneous world, constantly connected to information,” Mussoline said. “The bad is that we live in an instantaneous world, constantly connected to information.”

Mussoline welcomes digital technology, which the Chester County school district uses for educational purposes in its 16 schools.

“We all embrace technology and this instantaneous digital world in which we reside. In many ways it’s much better than in the past being forced to find out information well after the fact. The educational information at our fingertips today is 1,000 times better than at any other time in the history of mankind,” Mussoline said. “All we hope to accomplish with this initiative is to educate our DASD family to the concept of everything in moderation.”

Living in a world where we can hear about news instantly sometimes makes it seems like more bad things are happening more often. We went from hearing the news on TV at certain hours or reading about it in the local newspaper the next day to now seeing it first on social media or receiving text alerts. Someone told me that it had been a long time since they heard about breaking news on TV because they heard about it via news alerts on their cellphone.

When I'm in the field covering breaking news, I can still hear the voice of my late editor, Jim Callahan, telling me to "drop a dime" when I had information that we could disseminate on the newspaper website and social media accounts. He was an old school editor and newspaperman who spent his days in the field before cell phones and found a payphone to call his editor with the information he gathered. The reason why news articles are written with the most important information first is because of such phone calls and telegraphs. Reporters would pass along the most important details first in case the call was disconnected and because lengthy telegraphs were costly.

One day I wrote up a brief story on my cellphone and emailed it to Callahan to review and post online. I called him to let him know that and it gave him a chance to ask questions if needed as he edited my story. "Oh have times changed and developed, Dunbar," he said with a laugh before our conversation ended.


Daily Local News photographer Pete Bannan and multimedia journalist Ginger Rae Dunbar reported on a fire in Downingtown Borough. 
I even tweeted about the incident while on-scene. The best advice I heard from an AP writer about social media was not worry about being the first to put the news out there. Strive to be the first to get it right because the most important aspect of reporting is to be accurate.

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